Talk Like a DOG & Talk About GOD - Jay Adcock

Talk Like a DOG & Talk About GOD - Jay Adcock

Last week I was given the opportunity to do a voice over for a television commercial. I received a message from our pastor's wife, who does this type of work, telling me of the need for a male English speaker to do a small job. While I haven't ever done this kind of thing, I thought this would be an interesting experience. I showed up at the studio and was introduced to Martin, the sound technician. After a few minutes of chatting with him about the process, he walked me through the sound checks and off we went. I spent about 15 minutes doing the voice of...a dog! It was really fun to use my creativity and channel my inner dog while I ran through the three lines that they needed recorded.

His Grace Still Amazes Me! - Fran Griffith

His Grace Still Amazes Me! - Fran Griffith

My late husband, Gary, served as a worship and student pastor for most of the 22 years of our marriage. He sang and led songs in every genre of church music that you can imagine--from southern gospel and traditional hymns to the contemporary praise and worship songs of today. He loved them all because they told the story of the wonderful Savior that he devoted his life to serve.

The Highest of Virtues

If you asked twenty good men to-day what they thought the highest of virtues, nineteen of them would reply, Unselfishness.  But if you asked almost any of the great Christians ofold he would have replied, Love.  You see what has happened?  A negative term has been substituted for a positive, and this is of more than philosophical importance.  The negative ideal of Unselfishness carries with it the suggestion not primarily of securing good things for others, but of going without them ourselves, as if our abstinence and not their happiness was the important point.  I do not think this is the Christian virtue of Love.  The New Testament has lots to say about self-denial, but not about self-denial as an end in itself.  We are told to deny ourselves and take up our crosses in order that we may follow Christ; and nearly every description of what we shall ultimately find if we do so contains an appeal to desire.  If there lurks in most modern minds the notion that to desire our own good and earnestly to hope for the enjoyment of it is a bad thing, I submit that this notion has crept in from Kant and the Stoics and is no part of the Christian faith.  Indeed, if we consider the unblushing promises of reward and the swaggering nature of the rewards promised in the Gospels, it would seem that the Lord finds our desires, not too strong, but too weak.  We are half-hearted creatures, fooling around with drink and sex and ambition when infinite joy is offered us, like an ignorant child who wants to go on making mud pies in a slum because he cannot imagine what is meant by the offer of a holiday at sea.  We are far too easily please.

            - C. S. Lewis in The Weight of Glory

Limited Resources - Terry Parks

Limited Resources - Terry Parks

As winter deepens in the US, January brings summer time to Nicaragua. The season marks the harvest of coffee and the start of the school year in February. Each school year in the US marks a great push for gathering school supplies for children. In Nicaragua the same holds true but with limited resources for families in the remote villages the purchase of backpacks and supplies for their children is very difficult.